Anglo-Saxon Grounds During the Norman Conquest

The introduction of the Normans in the second half of the 11th century irreparably improved The Anglo-Saxon lifestyle. The ability of the Normans exceeded the Anglo-Saxons' in architecture and agriculture at the time of the conquest. However the Normans had to pacify the overall territory before they could focus on home life, domestic architecture, and decoration. Monasteries and castles served separate functions, so while monasteries were enormous stone structures built in only the most fruitful, wide dales, castles were set upon blustery knolls where the residents focused on learning offensive and defensive practices. ppd_483__95583.jpg Relaxing activities such as gardening were out of place in these desolate citadels. Berkeley Castle is perhaps the most unchanged model in existence today of the early Anglo-Norman form of architecture. It is said that the keep was introduced during William the Conqueror's time. A significant terrace serves as a discouraging factor to intruders who would attempt to mine the walls of the building. One of these terraces, a charming bowling green, is covered grass and flanked by an old yew hedge cut into the form of crude battlements.

The Father Of Rome's Water Fountain Design

In Rome’s city center, there are countless celebrated public fountains. One of the best ever sculptors and artists of the 17th century, Gian Lorenzo Bernini fashioned, conceptualized and built nearly all of them. His abilities as a fountain creator and also as a city architect, are evident throughout the streets of Rome. Ultimately transferring to Rome to completely express their art, chiefly in the form of public water fountains, Bernini’s father, a renowned Florentine sculptor, guided his young son. The young Bernini received compliments from Popes and relevant artists alike, and was an excellent worker. Originally he was recognized for his sculpting skills. Most famously in the Vatican, he used a base of knowledge in ancient Greek architecture and melded it effortlessly with Roman marble. Although many artists had an influence on his work, Michelangelo had the most profound effect.