Where did Large Garden Fountains Originate from?

The dramatic or ornamental effect of a fountain is just one of the purposes it fulfills, as well as delivering drinking water and adding a decorative touch to your property.

Originally, fountains only served a practical purpose. Cities, towns and villages made use of nearby aqueducts or springs to provide them with potable water as well as water where they could bathe or wash. pd-59b__01112.jpg Up until the 19th century, fountains had to be more elevated and closer to a water supply, including aqueducts and reservoirs, in order to take advantage of gravity which fed the fountains. Fountains were not only used as a water source for drinking water, but also to decorate homes and celebrate the designer who created it. The main materials used by the Romans to build their fountains were bronze or stone masks, mostly illustrating animals or heroes. Muslims and Moorish landscaping designers of the Middle Ages included fountains to re-create smaller versions of the gardens of paradise. To show his dominance over nature, French King Louis XIV included fountains in the Garden of Versailles. Seventeen and 18 century Popes sought to exalt their positions by adding beautiful baroque-style fountains at the point where restored Roman aqueducts arrived into the city.

Indoor plumbing became the key source of water by the end of the 19th century thereby restricting urban fountains to mere decorative elements. The introduction of unique water effects and the recycling of water were 2 things made possible by swapping gravity with mechanical pumps.

Modern-day fountains serve mostly as decoration for public spaces, to honor individuals or events, and compliment entertainment and recreational events.

Agrippa's Astonishing, but Mostly Forgotten Water-Lifting System

Although the device developed by Agrippa for moving water gained the esteem of Andrea Bacci in 1588, it seemed to fade not long thereafter. It might have come to be outdated once the Villa Medici was enabled to receive water from the Acqua Felice, the early modern conduit, in 1592. The easier account is that it was ignored about when Ferdinando left for Florence in 1588, after the death of his brother Francesco di Medici, to trade his status as cardinal for one as the Grand Duke of Tuscany. #P# It could defy the law of gravity to lift water to Renaissance gardens, nourishing them in a way other late sixteenth century concepts such as scenographic water presentations, music fountains and giochi d’acqua or water caprices, were not.