The Original Water Fountain Creative Designers

Multi-talented people, fountain designers from the 16th to the late 18th century often worked as architects, sculptors, artists, engineers and highly educated scholars all in one. Exemplifying the Renaissance skilled artist as a innovative legend, Leonardo da Vinci performed as an innovator and scientific specialist. He carefully documented his observations in his now celebrated notebooks about his studies into the forces of nature and the properties and movement of water. Coupling imagination with hydraulic and gardening talent, early Italian fountain designers modified private villa settings into innovative water exhibits full with symbolic meaning and natural beauty. Known for his virtuosity in archeology, architecture and garden design, Pirro Ligorio, the humanist, offered the vision behind the wonders in Tivoli. ft_236__61384.jpg Masterminding the fascinating water marbles, water features and water antics for the assorted mansions in the vicinity of Florence, other water fountain creators were well versed in humanistic subjects and classical scientific texts.

Water Delivery Strategies in Ancient Rome

With the manufacturing of the very first raised aqueduct in Rome, the Aqua Anio Vetus in 273 BC, folks who lived on the city’s foothills no longer had to depend only on naturally-occurring spring water for their demands. If citizens residing at higher elevations did not have access to springs or the aqueduct, they’d have to depend on the other existing solutions of the time, cisterns that accumulated rainwater from the sky and subterranean wells that received the water from under ground. To deliver water to Pincian Hill in the early sixteenth century, they employed the emerging technique of redirecting the motion from the Acqua Vergine aqueduct’s underground channel. As originally constructed, the aqueduct was provided along the length of its channel with pozzi (manholes) constructed at regular intervals. The manholes made it less demanding to clean the channel, but it was also achievable to use buckets to pull water from the aqueduct, as we witnessed with Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi when he possessed the property from 1543 to 1552, the year he passed away. Apparently, the rainwater cistern on his property wasn’t good enough to meet his needs. Via an opening to the aqueduct that flowed below his property, he was in a position to meet his water demands.