A Brief History of the First Outdoor Garden Fountains

Villages and villages relied on functional water fountains to conduct water for preparing food, bathing, and cleaning up from nearby sources like lakes, streams, or springs. In the years before electrical power, the spray of fountains was powered by gravity only, usually using an aqueduct or water source located far away in the nearby mountains. Fountains spanning history have been designed as monuments, impressing hometown citizens and tourists alike. The contemporary fountains of modern times bear little resemblance to the first water fountains. A stone basin, carved from rock, was the 1st fountain, used for containing water for drinking and ceremonial purposes. pd_161__85911.jpg 2000 B.C. is when the earliest known stone fountain basins were actually used. The first fountains put to use in ancient civilizations depended on gravity to regulate the flow of water through the fountain. These original water fountains were created to be functional, usually situated along aqueducts, creeks and waterways to supply drinking water. The people of Rome began constructing ornate fountains in 6 BC, most of which were bronze or natural stone masks of wildlife and mythological representations. Water for the open fountains of Rome was delivered to the city via a complex system of water aqueducts.

The Origins Of Garden Fountains

A fountain, an incredible piece of engineering, not only supplies drinking water as it pours into a basin, it can also launch water high into the air for a noteworthy effect.

From the beginning, outdoor fountains were soley there to serve as functional elements. Cities, towns and villages made use of nearby aqueducts or springs to provide them with potable water as well as water where they could bathe or wash. Until the late nineteenth, century most water fountains operated using the force of gravity to allow water to flow or jet into the air, therefore, they needed a source of water such as a reservoir or aqueduct located higher than the fountain. Serving as an element of adornment and celebration, fountains also provided clean, fresh drinking water. The main materials used by the Romans to create their fountains were bronze or stone masks, mostly depicting animals or heroes. Throughout the Middle Ages, Muslim and Moorish garden planners incorporated fountains to create smaller variations of the gardens of paradise. King Louis XIV of France wanted to illustrate his superiority over nature by including fountains in the Gardens of Versailles. Seventeen and 18 century Popes sought to extol their positions by including beautiful baroque-style fountains at the point where restored Roman aqueducts arrived into the city.

The end of the 19th century saw the increase in usage of indoor plumbing to provide drinking water, so urban fountains were relegated to strictly decorative elements. Fountains using mechanical pumps instead of gravity allowed fountains to provide recycled water into living spaces as well as create unique water effects.

These days, fountains adorn public spaces and are used to honor individuals or events and fill recreational and entertainment needs.