Where did Landscape Fountains Begin?

The incredible construction of a fountain allows it to provide clean water or shoot water high into air for dramatic effect and it can also serve as an excellent design feature to enhance your home.

Pure practicality was the original role of fountains. Cities, towns and villages made use of nearby aqueducts or springs to supply them with potable water as well as water where they could bathe or wash. Up until the 19th century, fountains had to be more elevated and closer to a water source, such as aqueducts and reservoirs, in order to take advantage of gravity which fed the fountains. Designers thought of fountains as wonderful additions to a living space, however, the fountains also served to provide clean water and honor the artist responsible for creating it. or-133__06258.jpg Bronze or stone masks of wildlife and heroes were commonly seen on Roman fountains. To depict the gardens of paradise, Muslim and Moorish garden planners of the Middle Ages added fountains to their designs. Fountains enjoyed a significant role in the Gardens of Versailles, all part of French King Louis XIV’s desire to exercise his power over nature. Seventeen and 18 century Popes sought to exalt their positions by adding beautiful baroque-style fountains at the point where restored Roman aqueducts arrived into the city.

Urban fountains built at the end of the nineteenth served only as decorative and celebratory adornments since indoor plumbing provided the essential drinking water. Amazing water effects and recycled water were made possible by replacing the force of gravity with mechanical pumps.

These days, fountains adorn public areas and are used to recognize individuals or events and fill recreational and entertainment needs.

The Function of Hydrostatics In The Design Of Outdoor Fountains

Liquid in a state of equilibrium applies pressure on the objects it meets, including its container. There are two types of force, hydrostatic energies and external forces. When pressing against a level wall, the fluid applies equal force at assorted points on the wall. Liquid in equilibrium will apply vertical pressure at every point of an object’s exterior when that object is fully submerged in the liquid. These vertical forces are buoyancy, and the concept by itself is more fully defined by Archimedes’principle. Hydrostatic pressure is made by hydrostatic force, when the force exerts itself on a point of liquid. A city’s water supply system, fountains, and artesian wells are all examples of the application of these concepts on containers.